• ACLs on Linux

    After setting up syncthing last week, I was concerned about security as I was using the software in a manner not intended by the developers. I was attempting to use one instance of syncthing for multiple users by running it under its own user space and granting it permissions on folders in my home directory.

  • Syncthing experience

    I have been using Dropbox for a few years now, and as most Dropbox users, ran out of space. During my early days of using Dropbox, I used to invite a lot of friends to Dropbox and earned 250MB/user to the point where I earned ~12 GB. But as time progressed, the returns were diminishing - almost everyone has a Dropbox account now and no one left to invite.

  • Improving apt-get performance.

    For the last few years, I have had half a dozen computers at home - including Raspberry Pis. Updating these computers required a lot of redundant bandwidth. While I was aware of caching solutions, I had not used them. I decided to try apt-cacher but soon ditched it in favour of apt-cacher-ng. apt-cacher-ng worked well for me for a few weeks until suddenly the updates became slow and stopped. I would be stuck at Fetching Headers for hours. Initially I thought that my cache needed cleaning. I tried nuking the cache, but that did not help. Next I tried disabling the proxy, but that did not work either.

  • VNC vs X11

    Recently, I have had an argument with Priyanka who prefers using GUI to terminal. She used VNC sessions to view her remote Linux machine desktops on Windows machines. The whole experience was slow and lagged a lot. I on the other hand preferred to use the terminal and used X11 forwarding when needed. My logic for favouring X11 forwarding was that I thought it made more efficient use of the bandwidth as all X11 programs had to send was rendering instructions instead of sending bitmaps of a rendered desktop (the VNC way). After a few days, I decided to google "VNC vs X11 forwarding" to see what other people thought of it.

  • apt-cyg: A Package Manager for Cygwin.

    Cygwin is a popular solution to use Linux/Unix applications on windows. Cygwin provides a POSIX (Portable Operating System Interface) compliant environment for development and execution of *Nix programs. Cygwin is available for x86 64 bits.

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